Understanding the level of affinity between two locations can determine the success of a move

    May 18, 2021 @ 01:58 PM / by Michael Joyce

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    In a recent series of posts Jeff Hawk discussed compensation challenges of sourcing talent, affinity, and purchasing power in "How Does Your Job Offer Stack Up?" Adam Silver followed with a post where he discussed “Attracting Talent,” which focused on one of the challenges that companies face within the U.S.—attracting talent to what are often perceived as “dying” cities. Now, Michael Joyce delves deeper into affinity and the potential impact when it doesn’t exist between a home and host location

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    Attracting Talent

    Apr 12, 2021 @ 06:00 AM / by Adam Silver

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    One of the challenges that companies face within the U.S. has been attracting talent to what are often perceived as “dying” cities, especially in the Rust Belt. Many people have a perception of these cities that may no longer match the reality on the ground and this can present a challenge for recruiting.

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    How does your job offer stack up?

    Apr 09, 2021 @ 10:51 AM / by Jeff Hawk

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    How does your job offer stack up? Increasingly, sourcing talent no longer means being confined by geography. Finding the right candidate for the job may entail a permanent transfer or cross-border hire, whether it be domestically or internationally. While this greatly expands hiring opportunities, it does present some interesting challenges.

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    Disrupted Transportation: A Cost-of-Living Survey in Athens, Greece

    Mar 10, 2020 @ 01:12 PM / by Eugene Kobiako

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    During a recent survey quarter, I had the pleasure of surveying Athens, Greece. While I was on-site, I encountered several protests and demonstrations, which allowed me to really feel like an assignee, navigating the change of social disruption.

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    Is this the most interesting job in the world?

    Feb 10, 2020 @ 07:50 PM / by Gerald Abbey

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    If it's not the most interesting job in the world, it's certainly one of them. AIRINC Cost-of-Living Surveyors travel all over the world for roughly six months of the year to collect pricing data. On the surface, this is the dream job for anyone that thrives on challenging global travel – the kind that takes grit and determination to grind through as you move cities on a seemingly daily basis. Instead of touring from site to site though, you move from store to store and source to source in each location, collecting data to populate a market basket of goods, services, housing, and hardship data. 

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    Expatriate Recreation and Tourism in Manama, Bahrain

    Dec 24, 2019 @ 12:15 AM / by Philli Wong

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    During my recent survey, I visited the Avenue Mall in Manama, a seafront mall stretching for 1.5 km. It reminded me of the Avenue Mall in Kuwait because it provides an outdoor feeling with large glass windows and skylights, while protecting shoppers from the burning sun. As anyone that’s traveled to Bahrain knows, the country is a popular destination for residents of Saudi Arabia seeking recreation and malls are one of the top attractions. Numerous expatriates and Saudi Arabians visit Bahrain for the shopping, movies, restaurants, waterparks, and other activities.

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    Resilient, Persistent, Intelligent, Savvy: Do you have what it takes to become an AIRINC Cost of Living Surveyor?

    Dec 04, 2019 @ 03:12 PM / by Gerald Abbey

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    Having worked as a surveyor for AIRINC, I can tell you it is one of the most unique and fascinating jobs in the world. On the surface, this is the dream job for anyone that thrives on challenging global travel – the kind that takes grit and determination to grind through as you move on a seemingly daily basis. Instead of touring from site to site though, you move from store to store and source to source, collecting data to populate a market basket of goods, services, housing, and hardship data.

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    The 3 Top Challenges with Driving in Nairobi, Kenya

    Dec 03, 2019 @ 02:00 AM / by Samuel Pearl Schwartz

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    On my last survey, a five-week trip across Africa, I visited Lagos, Nigeria and Cairo, Egypt, two of the most notorious traffic destinations in the world. These locations lived up to their hype, and I spent a lot of time sitting in traffic. However, I was surprised to find that Nairobi, Kenya’s traffic was almost as bad despite lacking the same level of notoriety. Nairobi’s three main issues are a shortage of stop signs and traffic lights at intersections, poor road quality, and incredible amounts of construction that disrupt traffic routes.

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    Kazakhstan’s Caspian Oil Towns

    Nov 26, 2019 @ 01:45 AM / by Rose Allen

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    During my recent survey, I visited two small cities in Kazakhstan near the Caspian Sea. Oil is the main industry in this region, and these cities are no exception. The first of these cities I visited was Aktau, which directly overlooks the Caspian Sea. The city was originally built as an oil camp decades ago, and even now the city feels rural. The air in the city is dry and roads are not particularly walkable.

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    Bangkok, Thailand: How do I avoid the traffic?

    Nov 19, 2019 @ 02:00 AM / by Samuel Pearl Schwartz

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    During my survey of Bangkok, I found the multiple transportation systems available for use extremely helpful, especially in comparison to other Southeast Asian cities. In Yangon, Hanoi, and Ho Chi Minh City, I was entirely dependent on taxis and rideshare apps, as there are no functioning rail systems, the buses are difficult for foreigners to use, and the cities are not particularly pedestrian friendly. Conversely, in Bangkok, I used a much more balanced mix of rideshare, metro (MRT), Skytrain (BTS), and walking.

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